History

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
4 Views · 18 hours ago

Fannie Lou Hamer was a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. She was born in 1917 in Mississippi and became involved in activism in the 1960s, particularly in voter registration efforts. Hamer co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and famously spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention, where she passionately advocated for the party to recognize and include African American voices. She dedicated her life to fighting for civil rights and social justice until her death in 1977.
© 1999

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
5 Views · 5 days ago

Malik Zulu Shabazz and Dr. Khalid Muhammad had a close relationship characterized by their shared activism in the African-American community. Shabazz served as Muhammad's personal attorney and was also a prominent member of the Nation of Islam, where both men were involved in advocating for social justice and empowerment of African-Americans.

Shabazz became widely known for his involvement in civil rights issues and his leadership roles within organizations such as the New Black Panther Party. While their specific roles and approaches differed at times, they both shared a commitment to addressing systemic inequalities and advocating for the rights of African-Americans.
© 2001

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
5 Views · 5 days ago

The Khalid Muhammad interview with Phil Donahue took place in 1994 on "The Phil Donahue Show." Khalid Muhammad was a controversial figure known for his radical views on race relations and black empowerment. During the interview, Muhammad expressed his views on topics such as white supremacy, black liberation, and the state of African Americans in society. The interview sparked a considerable amount of debate and controversy due to Muhammad's provocative statements and Donahue's challenging questions. It remains a significant moment in television history for its candid discussion of race and politics.
© 1994

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
9 Views · 6 days ago

Dr. Amos N. Wilson (1941–1995) was a renowned African-American psychologist, educator, and author who made significant contributions to the fields of psychology, education, and social activism. Born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Wilson grew up in Florida and later moved to New York City.

He earned his bachelor's degree from Morehouse College and went on to obtain master's and doctoral degrees in psychology from Fordham University. Throughout his career, Wilson focused on understanding and addressing the social, economic, and psychological challenges faced by African-Americans.

One of his major achievements was the founding of the National Association of Black Psychologists (NABP), an organization dedicated to promoting the mental health and well-being of African-Americans. Wilson served as the organization's president and played a key role in advancing its mission.

As an educator, Wilson taught at various institutions, including the City University of New York (CUNY) and the College of New Rochelle. He was known for his dynamic teaching style and his ability to engage students in critical discussions about race, identity, and power dynamics.

Wilson authored several influential books, including "Blueprint for Black Power: A Moral, Political, and Economic Imperative for the Twenty-First Century" and "The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness: Eurocentric History, Psychiatry, and the Politics of White Supremacy." These works challenged Eurocentric narratives and provided frameworks for understanding and combating systemic oppression.

Throughout his life, Dr. Amos Wilson advocated for the empowerment and liberation of African-Americans, emphasizing the importance of self-reliance, community solidarity, and cultural pride. His work continues to inspire scholars, activists, and educators to address social injustices and strive for equity and equality.

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
10 Views · 13 days ago

In his lectures, Cohran would discuss the importance of African traditions in shaping contemporary music and culture, highlighting the contributions of African rhythms, instruments, and philosophies to global artistic expressions. He also delved into topics such as the significance of oral traditions, the role of music in African societies, and the connections between African spirituality and musical creativity.Through his lectures, Cohran aimed to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of African culture and its enduring influence on the world. He believed in the power of education and cultural exchange to foster unity and respect among people of diverse backgrounds. Overall, his lectures served as a platform for sharing his passion for African heritage and inspiring others to explore and celebrate their own cultural roots.

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
4 Views · 13 days ago

Dr. Runoko Rashidi's lecture on Africa's contributions to the world typically covers a wide range of topics, highlighting the significant and often overlooked contributions of African peoples and civilizations throughout history. In his lectures, he discusses the advancements in various fields such as science, mathematics, astronomy, medicine, agriculture, architecture, and art that originated from Africa or were significantly influenced by African cultures.

He emphasizes the importance of recognizing Africa's role in shaping world history and challenges common misconceptions and stereotypes about the continent and its peoples. Dr. Rashidi's lectures often draw connections between ancient African civilizations, such as Egypt, Kush, and Axum, and their lasting impacts on global culture and civilization.

Additionally, he discusses the African diaspora and the contributions of African-descended peoples in different parts of the world, highlighting their achievements and struggles in various fields, including literature, music, politics, and social justice movements.

Dr. Runoko Rashidi's lectures serve to educate audiences about the rich and diverse history of Africa and its enduring influence on human civilization.

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
5 Views · 15 days ago

FINAL PART OF BIOGRAPHY OF BLACK JAZZ MUSICIANS :
Fats Waller:
Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer.Known for his stride piano style, Waller was a masterful improviser and composer, known for songs like "Ain't Misbehavin'" and "Honeysuckle Rose."He was a prominent figure during the Harlem Renaissance and was renowned for his energetic performances and charismatic personality.

Louis Armstrong:
Louis Armstrong, also known as "Satchmo" or "Pops," was a pioneering jazz trumpeter, vocalist, and influential figure in the development of jazz music.His innovative trumpet playing and gravelly voice helped define the jazz genre. He was known for his virtuosic improvisation and innovative use of scat singing.Armstrong's recordings such as "What a Wonderful World" and "Hello, Dolly!" are classics, and his influence on jazz and popular music is immeasurable.

John Coltrane:
John Coltrane was a groundbreaking saxophonist and composer who played a key role in the development of avant-garde jazz and free jazz.His albums such as "A Love Supreme" and "Giant Steps" are considered masterpieces and have had a profound influence on generations of musicians.Coltrane's innovative approach to harmony and improvisation, as well as his spiritual quest, continue to inspire jazz musicians around the world.

Nat King Cole:
Nat King Cole was an American jazz pianist and vocalist who became one of the most popular and successful entertainers of his time.He is best known for his smooth baritone voice and hits like "Unforgettable," "Mona Lisa," and "The Christmas Song."Cole broke barriers as one of the first African American performers to host a television variety show, "The Nat King Cole Show," in the 1950s.

Sarah Vaughan:
Sarah Vaughan was an exceptionally talented jazz vocalist known for her rich, expressive voice and impressive vocal range.Nicknamed "Sassy" and "The Divine One," Vaughan was celebrated for her mastery of both jazz and popular music.Her recordings, including "Misty" and "Lullaby of Birdland," showcase her remarkable vocal technique and emotional depth, solidifying her status as one of the greatest jazz singers of all time.

Marian Anderson:
Marian Anderson was a groundbreaking African American contralto who achieved international acclaim as one of the most distinguished classical singers of the 20th century.Despite facing racial discrimination, Anderson's talent and perseverance led her to become the first African American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.She is perhaps best known for her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after being denied permission to perform at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall, where she sang for an integrated audience of 75,000 people.

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
5 Views · 15 days ago

PART 3 of BIOGRAPHY of Black Jazz Musicians :

Fats Waller:
Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer.Known for his stride piano style, Waller was a masterful improviser and composer, known for songs like "Ain't Misbehavin'" and "Honeysuckle Rose."He was a prominent figure during the Harlem Renaissance and was renowned for his energetic performances and charismatic personality.

Louis Armstrong:
Louis Armstrong, also known as "Satchmo" or "Pops," was a pioneering jazz trumpeter, vocalist, and influential figure in the development of jazz music.His innovative trumpet playing and gravelly voice helped define the jazz genre. He was known for his virtuosic improvisation and innovative use of scat singing.Armstrong's recordings such as "What a Wonderful World" and "Hello, Dolly!" are classics, and his influence on jazz and popular music is immeasurable.

John Coltrane:
John Coltrane was a groundbreaking saxophonist and composer who played a key role in the development of avant-garde jazz and free jazz.His albums such as "A Love Supreme" and "Giant Steps" are considered masterpieces and have had a profound influence on generations of musicians.Coltrane's innovative approach to harmony and improvisation, as well as his spiritual quest, continue to inspire jazz musicians around the world.

Nat King Cole:
Nat King Cole was an American jazz pianist and vocalist who became one of the most popular and successful entertainers of his time.He is best known for his smooth baritone voice and hits like "Unforgettable," "Mona Lisa," and "The Christmas Song."Cole broke barriers as one of the first African American performers to host a television variety show, "The Nat King Cole Show," in the 1950s.

Sarah Vaughan:
Sarah Vaughan was an exceptionally talented jazz vocalist known for her rich, expressive voice and impressive vocal range.Nicknamed "Sassy" and "The Divine One," Vaughan was celebrated for her mastery of both jazz and popular music.Her recordings, including "Misty" and "Lullaby of Birdland," showcase her remarkable vocal technique and emotional depth, solidifying her status as one of the greatest jazz singers of all time.

Marian Anderson:
Marian Anderson was a groundbreaking African American contralto who achieved international acclaim as one of the most distinguished classical singers of the 20th century.Despite facing racial discrimination, Anderson's talent and perseverance led her to become the first African American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.She is perhaps best known for her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after being denied permission to perform at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall, where she sang for an integrated audience of 75,000 people.

Nana Kamau Kambon Archives
5 Views · 15 days ago

THIS IS PART 2 OF BLACK JAZZ MUSICIANS :

Fats Waller:
Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer.Known for his stride piano style, Waller was a masterful improviser and composer, known for songs like "Ain't Misbehavin'" and "Honeysuckle Rose."He was a prominent figure during the Harlem Renaissance and was renowned for his energetic performances and charismatic personality.

Louis Armstrong:
Louis Armstrong, also known as "Satchmo" or "Pops," was a pioneering jazz trumpeter, vocalist, and influential figure in the development of jazz music.His innovative trumpet playing and gravelly voice helped define the jazz genre. He was known for his virtuosic improvisation and innovative use of scat singing.Armstrong's recordings such as "What a Wonderful World" and "Hello, Dolly!" are classics, and his influence on jazz and popular music is immeasurable.

John Coltrane:
John Coltrane was a groundbreaking saxophonist and composer who played a key role in the development of avant-garde jazz and free jazz.His albums such as "A Love Supreme" and "Giant Steps" are considered masterpieces and have had a profound influence on generations of musicians.Coltrane's innovative approach to harmony and improvisation, as well as his spiritual quest, continue to inspire jazz musicians around the world.

Nat King Cole:
Nat King Cole was an American jazz pianist and vocalist who became one of the most popular and successful entertainers of his time.He is best known for his smooth baritone voice and hits like "Unforgettable," "Mona Lisa," and "The Christmas Song."Cole broke barriers as one of the first African American performers to host a television variety show, "The Nat King Cole Show," in the 1950s.

Sarah Vaughan:
Sarah Vaughan was an exceptionally talented jazz vocalist known for her rich, expressive voice and impressive vocal range.Nicknamed "Sassy" and "The Divine One," Vaughan was celebrated for her mastery of both jazz and popular music.Her recordings, including "Misty" and "Lullaby of Birdland," showcase her remarkable vocal technique and emotional depth, solidifying her status as one of the greatest jazz singers of all time.

Marian Anderson:
Marian Anderson was a groundbreaking African American contralto who achieved international acclaim as one of the most distinguished classical singers of the 20th century.Despite facing racial discrimination, Anderson's talent and perseverance led her to become the first African American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.She is perhaps best known for her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after being denied permission to perform at the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitution Hall, where she sang for an integrated audience of 75,000 people.




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